Our Board

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Alison Holloran is the executive director of Audubon Rockies and a vice president of the National Audubon Society. She was hired in 2001 as the Important Bird Area coordinator and has since played many roles in implementing Audubon’s conservation strategies. Before Audubon Alison was a research scientist for the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at the University of Wyoming. She received her master's degree in zoology and physiology from the University of Wyoming and her B.S. in wildlife management from the University of West Virginia. Alison enjoys any activity that takes her outdoors, including hiking, birdwatching, hunting, skiing, and running.

Jamie Weiss - Co-Chair

Jamie is the Habitat Hero coordinator for Audubon Rockies, a regional office of National Audubon Society. Along with her B.S. in marine biology and chemistry from the University of North Carolina Wilmington, Jamie is a certified interpretive guide through the National Association for Interpretation. She previously worked at Boyd Lake State Park and the Georgia Aquarium as an educational interpreter, raising conservation awareness. When not working, she is often leading an active lifestyle trying to keep up with her two boys. She enjoys hiking, camping, snowboarding, and long-distance running.

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Greg is an Associate Professor and the Associate Director of the Community and School Garden Program at the University of Arizona. Greg and his students study how plants and ecosystems respond to threats from drought, climate change, and human pressures like over grazing or clearing for renewable energy production. For the last past decade, Greg's team have directed this science to build the field of 'agrivoltaics' in the USA. Greg began in southern Arizona, studying the benefits across the food-energy-water nexus, and over the years his team have developed a national and international program connecting with researchers in Colorado and Oregon and in Africa and the Middle East. Helping develop science-based solutions to help people adapt to the increasing pressures that come from a changing climate is a personal and professional goal of Greg's.

Elise Jones is the Executive Director of the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project (SWEEP) a Boulder based nonprofit that promotes policies and programs to advance energy efficiency and clean transportation in a six-state region. She is an acting member of the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission and serves as the co-chair of the RTD Accountability Committee. Before joining SWEEP in January 2021, Elise served as a Boulder County Commissioner for eight years. Prior to running for public office, Elise was the Executive Director of the Colorado Environmental Coalition (now called Conservation Colorado), which advocates for stronger climate, energy, wilderness, land use, transportation and other environmental policies. Elise holds a bachelor’s degree in Natural Resources from Cornell University in New York and a master’s in Resource Policy, Planning and Administration from the University of Michigan. Elise lives in Boulder with her partner, Karl, and their daughter, McKenzie, where she likes to spend time trail running, mountain biking and telemark skiing.

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Jordan Macknick is the Lead Energy-Water-Land Analyst for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. He is a member of the Strategic Energy Analysis Center’s Systems Modeling team within the Resources and Sustainability Group. Jordan’s primary work addresses the environmental impacts of energy technologies, while seeking opportunities for energy and ecological synergies. In his energy-water-land leadership capacity, Jordan analyzes national and regional implications of different energy pathways in the context of water and land resources, evaluates opportunities to improve the energy management of water infrastructure, and explores innovative approaches to co-locating solar and agricultural activities.  Jordan received his BA in Mathematics and Environmental Studies from Hamline University in 2005, and his Master of Environmental Science degree in Transboundary Natural Resource Policy from Yale in 2009.  Jordan’s areas of expertise include systems modeling of energy and water infrastructure interactions, renewable-powered water treatment systems, meta-analysis of diverse data sets, and low-impact renewable energy development.